Line of the Day

“Freedom and security are inverse quantities. The more you have of one, the less you must necessarily have of the other. Freedom is dangerous. Freedom can get you hurt. Freedom can mean failure and bankruptcy and hard times. But if you trade your freedom for security, how can you be secure against those whom you have given it to?”

The Morning Rant from the Ace of Spades HQ.

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Why Bother?

A short gem from Seth Godin:

Mobile blindness

You don’t need a peer-reviewed study to know that when people surf the web on their smartphones, they’re not going as deep.

We swipe instead of click.

We scan instead of read. Even our personal email…

We get exposure to far more at the surface, but rarely dig in.


If you care about something,
consider taking a moment to slow down
and understand it.
And if you don’t care, no need
to even bother with the surface.


As a result, the fine print gets ignored. We go for headlines, not nuance. It’s a deluge of gossip and thin promises, not the relatively more immersive experience of the desktop web.

And of course, the web was a surface treatment of a day spent with books and in uninterrupted flow on a single topic.

It’s not an accident that blog posts and tweets are getting shorter. We rarely stick around for the long version.

Photokeratitis (snow blindness) happens when there’s too much ultraviolet–when the fuel for our eyes comes in too strong and we can’t absorb it all. Something similar is happening to each of us, to our entire culture, as a result of the tsunami of noise vying for our attention.

It’s possible you can find an edge by going even faster and focusing even more on breadth at the surface. But it’s far more satisfying and highly leveraged to go the other way instead. Even if it’s just for a few hours a day.

If you care about something, consider taking a moment to slow down and understand it. And if you don’t care, no need to even bother with the surface.

And yes, I get the irony of this post – on a blog – where you typically don’t get very deep.

Line of the Day

“I’ve got a message for all of the ‘brave’ high school students who are walking out of school for gun control: Where are you when that weird-looking nerd in your class gets picked on and bullied by the cool kids? Why aren’t you, the supposedly ‘woke’ protestors, standing up for him and against the malevolent alpha clique? Because that’s your injustice right there, staring at you in the face, and you pretend not to see it. Because going up against the pecking order is dangerous, and it’s a lot more fun to cut class and run your fool mouths about things you don’t know anything about than to actually do something, however small, to make your school a better place. You’re not virtuous, you’re just virtue-signaling. So get back to class.

Ace of Spades blog

Line of the Day

“Today is the 248th anniversary of The Boston Massacre. Five years later we began the greatest social experiment in history by throwing out the greatest military power of the day.

Today the progressive left would deny that opportunity to the rest of the world, and are industriously trying to destroy what the American people have created with the freedoms we fought for.”

Ace of Spades blog

Line of the Day

“So the reason I’m here tonight is to put people on the spot. I want people to feel uncomfortable.  I want them to have to answer people at home who said, ‘How come you were against President Obama’s deficits and then how come you’re for Republican deficits?’ Isn’t that the very definition of intellectual dishonesty? If you were against President Obama’s deficits, and now you’re for the Republican deficits, isn’t that the very definition of hypocrisy?”

Senator Rand Paul

(This quote is less than two minutes into the link.)

Walter Williams on Immigration

Another insightful column by Walter Williams:

Immigration: Lies vs. reality

President Donald Trump reportedly asked why the U.S. is “having all these people from s–thole countries come here.” I think he could have used better language, but it’s a question that should be asked and answered.

I have a few questions for my fellow Americans to consider. How many Norwegians have illegally entered our nation, committed crimes and burdened our prison and welfare systems? I might ask the same question about Finnish, Swedish, Welsh, Icelanders, Greenlanders and New Zealanders. The bulk of our immigration problem is with people who enter our country criminally from Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, Africa and the Middle East. It’s illegal immigrants from those countries who have committed crimes and burdened our criminal justice and welfare systems. A large number of immigrants who are here illegally – perhaps the majority are law-abiding in other respects – have fled oppressive, brutal and corrupt regimes to seek a better life in America.


Should we permit foreigners landing at our airports to ignore U.S. border control laws just as some ignore our laws at our southern border?


In the debate about illegal immigration, there are questions that are not explicitly asked but can be answered with a straight “yes” or “no”: Does everyone in the world have a right to live in the U.S.? Do Americans have a right to decide who and under what conditions a person may enter our country? Should we permit foreigners landing at our airports to ignore U.S. border control laws just as some ignore our laws at our southern border? The reason those questions are not asked is that one would be deemed an idiot for saying that everyone in the world has a right to live in our country, that Americans don’t have a right to decide who lives in our country and that foreigners landing at our airports have a right to just ignore U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents.

Immigration today, even when legal, is different from the immigration of yesteryear. People who came here in the 19th century and most of the 20th century came here to learn our language, learn our customs and become Americans. Years ago, there was a guarantee that immigrants came here to work, because there was no welfare system; they worked, begged or starved. Today, there is no such assurance. Because of our welfare state, immigrants can come here and live off taxpaying Americans.


Americans are afraid and unwilling to ask which immigrant groups have become a burden to our nation and which have made a contribution to the greatness of America.


There is another difference between today and yesteryear. Today, Americans are taught multiculturalism throughout their primary, secondary and college education. They are taught that one culture is no better or worse than another. To believe otherwise is criticized at best as Eurocentrism and at worst as racism. As a result, some immigrant groups seek to bring to our country the cultural values whose failures have led to the poverty, corruption and human rights violations in their home countries that caused them to flee. As the fallout from President Trump’s indelicate remarks demonstrates, too many Americans are afraid and unwilling to ask which immigrant groups have become a burden to our nation and which have made a contribution to the greatness of America.


The whole concept of sanctuary cities is to give aid, comfort and sympathy to people who have broken our laws.


Very unfortunate for our nation is that we have political groups that seek to use illegal immigration for their own benefit. They’ve created sanctuary cities and states that openly harbor criminals – people who have broken our laws. The whole concept of sanctuary cities is to give aid, comfort and sympathy to people who have broken our laws. Supporters want to prevent them from having to hide and live in fear of discovery. I’d ask whether, for the sake of equality before the law, we should apply the sanctuary concept to Americans who have broken other laws, such as robbers and tax evaders.


We should not fall prey to people who criticize our efforts to combat illegal immigration and who pompously say, “We’re a nation of immigrants!” The debate is not over immigration. The debate is over illegal immigration.


We should not fall prey to people who criticize our efforts to combat illegal immigration and who pompously say, “We’re a nation of immigrants!” The debate is not over immigration. The debate is over illegal immigration. My sentiments on immigrants who are here legally and who want to become Americans are expressed by the sentiments in Emma Lazarus’ poem “The New Colossus,” which is on a plaque inside the Statue of Liberty and in part says, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”